The kitchen is pau and open for business!

Posted by Stacy

Have you heard the good news?  The Waipa poi mill, kitchen and hale imu are complete!  Food entrepreneurs started using the kitchen in March, and applications are still being accepted.  Call our office at 826-9969 for information.

The new facilities are named Laukupu.  In the mo'olelo of 'Aukelenuia'iku, Laukupu was a mythical leaf that fed and caused man to thrive. As you can see in the photos, Waipa’s programs, staff and volunteers have been using the kitchen to experiment with all sorts of products like poi bread, pizza and prepared salads.  Laukupu is also home to Pili Au, our new food and farm tour.  *Pili Au info.

The imu (underground oven) works well and has been used since Laukupu’s blessing celebration last September.  At Thanksgiving, our team and folks from Kaua`i Mini Golf cooked 1,000 lbs of turkey, ulu and `uala for their free community Thanksgiving dinner, and for Waipa ‘ohana. 

Mahalo to your, our community, for all of your support, and mahalo also to our many patient funders and our amazing contractors- Chad Rausch, (General) and HokuSwartman (Septic & Wastewater), for helping make Laukupu a reality.

Entry posted on 03/21/2016

 

New Facilities Almost Pau

Posted by Waipa

After a year of construction, the Waipa Poi Mill, Kitchen, and Hale Imu buildings are almost pau! Most of the construction is complete, and we are awaiting the installation of equipment.  We look forward to opening these facilities for community use (and our own programs) in September.

The new facilities (pictured here) offer versatile spaces, fully equipped with commercial grade equipment, including a walk in refrigerator and freezer. The poi mill's kalo and poi processing includes cooking, grinding and bagging equipment with a cook capacity of 16 bags of kalo at a time. The hale imu is an open air space with a concrete and fire brick lined imu that can be covered when not in use so as to enable more space for outdoor gatherings.

We, at Waipa, hope that the availability of these facilities, and the classes, workshops and trainings that will soon be available, inspire entrepreneurs from the community to start, or grow food related businesses. To inquire about use of the facilities, call our office at 826-9969.

 

Entry posted on 08/19/2015

 

What's hiding in Waipa's Pu'uhonua?

Posted by Stacy

Ever wondered what’s up with those floating rafts of plants in Waipa'Halulu Fishpond?  Does anyone ever go out there and check on them?   We call those rafts our Waipa “pu`uh?nua” because they provide a place of refuge for baby fish, shrimp and other creatures which might get eaten by predators in the deeper parts of the pond.  Most of the pu`uhonua are planted with native plants and kalo, and two with the invasive Water Hyacinth, which were already in the pond, to create a clean mud-free habitat for creatures, and to see what kind of habitat they prefer.  The plants are planted on top and their roots hang down through the coconut fiber mat providing habitat both above and below the water.

In April, Dr. Carl Berg and Wiley Barker, along with a few volunteer helpers, had some pu`uhonua hukilau to count, weigh, and measure the fish, shrimp, snails and tadpoles on the rafts.  Carl and Wiley waded out into the stinky muck of the pond and put a seine net under each raft to capture whatever creatures were in, on, and around it.  Then, they hauled the raft onto the bank and took photos of the top and bottom of the raft before shaking the creatures off onto a tarp.  Helpers gathered up o`opu, opae, tadpoles and the odd frog, hapawai or `aholehole, and put them into containers of water before helping Wiley and Carl to measure, weigh, count and throw them back into the pond...except in the case of the tadpoles, since they are invasive. 

The highest count of one species was over 300 tadpoles counted on just one raft.  “The number and size of each species varies by season” says Carl, a biologist, “as well as who else is on the raft”.  “Just one big o`opu or bullfrog means there will be a lot less opae”.  The pu`uhonua project was Carl's idea, after creating the rafts for another purpose-to remove excess nutrients flowing from taro fields into Hanalei Bay.  Waipa's pu'uhonua are funded by the US Fish and Wildlife Service Fish Habitat Restoration Project. 

Project assistant Wiley Barker is a senior at Kapa`a High School and joined the project about a year and a half ago after visiting Waip? with Kamehameha Schools Scholars Program.  She is doing her senior project on the pu`uhonua.   

If you love slimy creatures or recording data, volunteer helpers are welcome on the following dates at 2pm at Halulu Fishpond. 

Friday 5/22

Friday 6/26

Friday 7/24

Call our office, 826.9969 for more info!

Entry posted on 05/14/2015

 

Bringing Home the Greens!

Posted by Lea

Our Waipa afterschool program keiki are experiencing farm-to-table first hand this year. A major component of our after school program is gardening. Each keiki (or 'ohana) has their own garden plot and has been working hard each week to prep, plant, maintain, and harvest an abundance of veggies. Some of the veggies they have been growing and taking home are: kale, lettuce, beets, carrots, cabbage, cilantro, string beans, and green onions.

We are thrilled with the excitement and enthusiasm the keiki show in taking responsibility for their own garden plots, and the sense of pride they feel in being able to provide their 'ohana with fresh veggies each week. There is definitely a huge difference in how much effort they put into the garden, when it is their own.  Not to mention, the tendencies they have to actually eat and enjoy veggies when they grow them themselves.

These keiki are also learning the invaluable lesson that you get back what you put in, as those who take the extra time to weed and malama their garden, end up with the healthiest, most vibrant and abundant produce.

We are so thankful for the opportunity to work with these keiki and do and share the things we love and believe in. A big shout out to Hau'oli Mau Loa foundation for providing us with the funding and opportunity to work with these amazing keiki.

Pictured, top to bottom.

Jayda, Mahea, Helena and Kaena planting their lettuce; Jaden, Kama, Keale and Gracie walking back from the garden with their goods; washing veggies after our first harvest; sisters Helena and Kaena with their weekly bag of greens to take home.

 

Entry posted on 03/09/2015

 

Kitchen and Poi Mill Construction Update

Posted by Stacy

Driven by Waipa during the last month wondering about our new construction project?  Or maybe you donated to our capital campaign for the Waipa Kitchen & Poi Mill a long time ago and wondered what ever happened to it?

We are so grateful and excited to report that construction of the Waipa Poi Mill, Kitchen and Hale Imu is underway!

Waipa  held a ceremonial groundbreaking on July 23rd, and work started in August.   From the start of conceptual design, it took 7 years to get permits, funding, and contractor in place, but these important new facilities will finally open in 2015.

Waipa looks forward to offering more classes, workshops and programs in the kitchen, as well as encouraging facility use by farmers and food entrepreneurs in our north shore communities, 

If you enjoy growing food or cooking, or if you own or are interested in owning a food related business like farming, catering and value added products, we encourage you to stay in touch by joining our “kitchen” list.  Contact Kalen Kelekoma at kalen@wpafoundation.org or 826-9969.

Pictured, top to bottom.

Chad Rausch and Dan Miller of Chad Rausch Construction, project general contractor; Removing dirt from the excavation for the imu; Forms set for concrete pad of the kitchen and poi mill.

 

Entry posted on 09/05/2014

 

Stream Restoration Project Update

Posted by Matt

In 2011 we started an exciting new project at Waipa to restore an area of Waipa Stream that had become blocked with dense stands of hau bush over many years. While hau (hibiscus tiliaceus) has a history as a very useful resource plant in Hawaii, it also exhibits invasive tendencies in stream and wetland  environments when left unmanaged. An extreme example of this was found at Waipa, where hau had grown into the stream causing sediment and plant debris to fill up the stream channel. This degraded important spawning habitat and created substantial obstacles for migrating native fish and prawns that have to pass through this section of the stream at least twice during their life cycle.

The Waipa Stream Restoration Project was designed to remove barriers to fish passage and enhance habitat for native aquatic species in Waipa Stream. It is also improving wetland and riparian habitats along the stream that are important  for endangered native waterbirds (such as the Nene goose and Koloa duck) and the Hawaiian Hoary Bat.

As of March 2013, several acres of hau bush have been cleared along the choked reach of Waipa Stream. Much of the cleared hau material was chipped on-site to create mulch  used for erosion control in the clearing areas. In flood-prone areas where mulching is not suitable, hau is being burned with the resulting charcoal and ash harvested for use in Waipa's gardens and taro loi. Approximately 1,000 feet of the stream channel has been cleaned of hau debris, and fish passage conditions in the project area have improved already.

Outplanting of the clearings with native Hawaiian and canoe plants began in July 2011 and is ongoing. There has been a strong focus on cultural plants that will produce food or other resources that can be used for the Waipa Foundation's various educational and cultural activities and programs.

An important element of the Waipa Stream Restoration Project is monitoring the impacts of the restoration work on the stream's water quality and aquatic life. To accomplish this, monitoring programs have been established to regularly measure streamflow and water quality at various points along the stream. Also, net surveys are being performed in the Waipa Stream Estuary and snorkel surveys are being conducted in the stream at several sites to collect data about habitat quality and habitat use by native and non-native species. Interns funded by AmeriCorps and the Hawaii Youth Conservation Corps have been important in carrying out the project's monitoring programs.

Funding for the project is being provided by the Hawaii Community Foundation (HCF), The National Oceanographic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) and the US Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS). Matching funds are being provided by Kamehameha Schools and The Waipa Foundation.  Volunteer efforts on this project will be extremely important to its long-term success. Over 1,000 volunteers have already contibuted to the Waipa Stream Restoration Project. A series of community workday events is planned for spring/summer 2013 . If you would like to volunteer please contact the project manager, Matt Rosener,  at laminarmatt@gmail.com or call the Waipa Foundation at 826-9969.

Entry posted on 04/22/2013

 

Waipa is under construction!

Posted by Stacy

Anyone who has visited us since mid-September will have noticed there are some changes at Waipa, and a lot of activity going on in the big field.  What kind of changes?  Well, for starters, the big ironwood tree which used to provide shade for parking and for us to gather in piko is now gone.  Drivers at Waipa now need to dodge black silt cloth and lots of stakes and flags.  Activity and work is concentrated at the site where new buildings will be located, near the gardens. 

All of this activity is due to construction starting on a Multipurpose Building that Kamehameha Schools is building for Waipa’s use.  After more than six years of design, funding allocation, and permitting, the work has finally started, and the facility is quickly taking shape.  The building will provide Waipa Foundation staff and the thousands of learners that visit each year with a new space in support of educational programs and community gatherings.

After this first building is done, Waipa Foundation, will then begin construction on our new certified Community Kitchen, Poi Mill and Hale Imu (housed in two new buildings adjacent to the multipurpose building).  Permitting for those new facilities is nearly complete, and in the next seven months we will need to raise the remaining funds for construction.  We expect the next two buildings to take about a year more to construct, after which the kitchen and poi mill will be available for Waipa and community use.  In addition to providing new opportunities for community entrepreneurs and new "food focused" educational and training programs, the certified kitchen and poi mill will also help us to bring Waipa’s signature products to our Farmers Market, and other events celebrating local food!

So, if you visit Waipa anytime soon, please be sure to watch for the stakes, and don’t park in the big field- park in the yard in front of our offices.  We have already moved our Tuesday Farmers Market to the field by the Waipa Ranch, in front of our plant nursery.  Kalo Festival parking will be at this location as well, and the festival is definitely a great reason to come visit! For more on Kalo Festival this year, check out:  http://waipafoundation.org/events/ 

Entry posted on 11/13/2012

 

Waipa Stream Restoration Flows Forward

Posted by Matt

In 2011 we started an exciting new project at Waipa to restore a section of Waipa Stream that had become blocked with dense stands of hau bush over many years. The hau bush had grown into the stream causing sediment and plant debris to fill up the stream channel. This created an obstacle for migrating native fish and prawns that have to pass through this section of Waipa Stream during spawning season. The Waipa Stream Restoration Project was designed to remove barriers to fish passage and enhance habitat for native aquatic species in Waipa Stream. It is also serving to enhance wetland and riparian areas along the stream that are important habitat for endangered native waterbirds (such as the Nene goose and Koloa duck) and the Hawaiian Hoary Bat.

As of March 2012, approximately 1.5 acres of hau bush have been cleared along one side of Waipa Stream and used to create mulch which was then spread across the clearing area. Outplanting of the cleared area with native Hawaiian and canoe plants began in July 2012 and is ongoing. An additional 1.75 acres near the blocked section of the stream has been cleared of hau bush, but further treatment of this area is needed before the outplanting effort can begin here. Approximately 600 feet of the stream channel has been cleaned of hau debris; this means that the primary barrier to fish passage in the stream has been removed. During the summer of 2012, an additional 2-3 acres of hau bush will be removed on the opposite side of the stream from the 2011 work area.

An important element of the Waipa Stream Restoration Project is monitoring the impacts of the restoration work on the stream's water quality and aquatic life. To this end, monitoring programs have been established to regularly measure streamflow rates and water quality parameters at various points along the stream. Also, net surveys are being performed in the Waipa Stream Estuary and snorkel surveys are being conducted in the stream at several sites to collect data about habitat quality and habitat use by native and non-native species. Two interns funded by AmeriCorps and the Hawaii Youth Conservation Corps have been important in carrying out the project's monitoring programs.

Funding for the project is being provided by the Hawaii Community Foundation, The National Oceanographic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) and the US Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS). Matching funds are being provided by Kamehameha Schools and The Waipa Foundation.  Volunteer efforts on this project are important to its long-term success. If you would like to volunteer on this project please contact the project manager, Matt Rosener  at laminarmatt@gmail.com or call Waipa at 826-9969.

Entry posted on 07/25/2012

 

Clearing invasive weeds at Makaihuwa'a

Posted by Lea

While preparing for full moon camping up at Makaihuwa'a (one of the ridges outlining the Waipa ahupua'a), two members of the Waipa 'ohana were recently caught on camera while clearing invasive weeds.

But who is the mystery weed whacker with Lea?

HINT:  The shorter one is Lea ;)  and don't let the size of the mystery weed whacker's weed whacker fool you.

Visit https://www.facebook.com/Waipa.Ohana and leave us a comment with your guess. Hurry! The first person to correctly identify this mystery weed whacker will win a Waipa t-shirt!

Only guesses submitted via facebook count.  We will acknowledge the winner here and on Facebook.  Good luck!

UPDATE:  It took only a few hours for one of our akamai 'ohana on Facebook to identify our garden manager, Kari.  Lea flexed her photo editing skills by blending 2 different photo's taken that day.

Entry posted on 10/30/2011

 

Refurbishing Wa`a, Just In Time for Summer!

Posted by Stacy

During the winter and spring of 2011, Waipa staff and interns, led by Trevor Cabell, built and refurbished four wa`a for use in our programs. A four man wa`a pe`a (sailing canoe), two four-man paddling canoes, and one six-man Albesia canoe were readied for use this summer.

The wa`a were blessed by Aunty Puna Kalama Dawson, in a beautiful ceremony and celebration held in April. Her halau, Waipa `ohana, and members of Kaiola Canoe Club and the local paddling/sailing community were all present.

Keiki participating in Waipa’s Summer programs this year indeed benefitted from these wa`a, as they explored the waters of Hanalei Bay, deepening their connection with the kai, gaining new skills and experiences, and having fun! Now that the early summer rush is over, Waipa plans to continue to utilize the wa`a in it’s programs, and also to begin it’s own monitoring program of Waipa’s nearshore resources.

Mahalo to Trevor, Kapule and Kaipo, the Waipa Interns, Aunty Puna, the Hau`oli Mau Loa Foundation, the Kamehameha Schools `Aina Ulu program, and all those who contributed to providing Waipa with these valuable learning resources.

Entry posted on 07/27/2011

 

We welcome your comments and feedback at our facebook page (see below). Be sure to also check our events page (above) to see what's next here at Waipa!

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